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Hot, hot, hot – but a rain shower finally.

Written by: Bobbie
June 6, 2011

SOLD

Yesterday, Sunday June 5, we finally got our first summer shower. What a relief. It cooled the air down by several degrees but most of all it delivered the much needed water to our parched pastures. It looks like we may have a few more days of scattered showers and I’m hoping they all reach us. However, out friends to the east in Madison, Florida still have not seen any.

We have breeding ewes (female sheep) at our friend B O’Toole’s Herb Farm about 35 miles east of here. The girls (Hagrid is the daddy and that’s another story) are expecting lambs in the next few weeks so we are watching carefully. B O’Toole has KUDZU. Now kudzu is a bad word in some circles, however, it is delicious and nutritious to sheep. Although the kudzu has been under some stress without enough rain, it is growing. It is more drought resistant than most grazing material.

Anyway, I’m going to B’s this morning to move some portable fencing so we can get the ewes out to better grazing.  She has lady friends that volunteer to help her in the greenhouse every Monday and she cooks up a soup for lunch, someone brings a good wine and I’m taking a cake.  Ah, farm life is so tough. You want to see a project done quickly just put five to seven women on it that are looking for lunch and then stand back. I’ll be taking pictures today for next weeks update.

Two sets of lamb twins

Two sets of lamb twins

We did have lambs born here earlier this spring and they are all developing nicely. It is exciting to anticipate this next lambing. Here are two sets of twins.

Now Hagrid, the main man. Actually he’s not going to be for long. He has taken to ramming anyone that comes into the pasture if they don’t have food in a bucket and pour it quickly. That can be a dangerous situation since he probably weighs 225 to 250. We just don’t tolerate mean roosters, goats or sheep at our place. Too many nice ones on hand to put up with that. He has sired some great offspring and one lucky guy will take his place soon.